Home Working

How to Prepare For (and Embrace) Hybrid Working

Has your organisation remained productive throughout the pandemic, even as everybody works separately from their homes?

If so, you could be thinking about giving up that expensive office lease.

However, don’t be too hasty. According to in-depth research by the Adecco Group, 77% of UK employees believe that ‘hybrid working’ – a mix of office-based and remote working – is the best way forwards once Covid-19 restrictions are lifted.

In a recent thought piece, the CIPD state that, since “fears about falling productivity have not been realised… most employers expect hybrid ways of working to become commonplace post-pandemic.”

As you might imagine, hybrid working is a particularly popular choice for working parents, with 57% keen on striking a flexible balance between time spent in the office and at home.

How to Stop Your Staff from Burning Out in Lockdown

The third national UK lockdown may have officially begun on 5th January, but for many people, it will have felt much longer ago. As well as coping with the intense, stressful 'stop-start' environment we currently live in, we are also trying to keep ourselves and our families fed, watered, motivated, and in some cases, educated from the kitchen table. And as if all that wasn't bad enough, we've still got another long, dark month of winter in lockdown ahead. In times like these, it is vital that employers provide an effective programme of support. Here are three ways to help your staff avoid burnout in February.

How to Organise a Virtual Office Christmas Party

If you're in charge of planning this year's Christmas event, it could feel like you've drawn the short straw. Not only has Covid-19 wreaked havoc over our plans to meet in person, but after months of staring at screens for work, rest and play, who really wants another round of Zoom drinks? But that doesn't mean you can't organise some virtual – and much needed – festive fun for your hard-working team. Here are some ideas to help you organise an online office Christmas party to remember.

How to Lead a Remote Workforce

If there's one word that could be used to describe 2020 so far, it's "uncertain." The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked immense, unprecedented change over how we live and work, and the way forwards is still unclear. To help manage the second wave of the virus, England has just entered a second lockdown; one that some news reports claim may last into 2021. With swathes of people instructed to work from home until the foreseeable future, there is at least one reliable forecast: remote working is here to stay. This means that, just as companies have adapted their business practices to the rise of technology, their leaders must now adapt to the rise of the remote workforce. The route to home working The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) report that "before Covid-19, one in three of us worked from home at least one day a week." This figure rose to 60% in July, with 46% – almost half the UK population – working from home on five days per week. Prominent companies have announced long-term plans for remote working, including Lloyds Banking Group, who recently stated that staff will be working at home until spring 2021 at least. Meanwhile, Deloitte has decided not to renew the property leases on four of its key UK offices, giving over 500 staff the opportunity to work from home full time. These reports support the recent CIPD finding that "employers expect the proportion of the workforce that works from home regularly to double (to 37%)" even after the crisis is over.

How to Make Homeworking Work for Your Company

Once upon a time, allowing employees to work from home was a flexible 'nice to have' for many organisations. Now, in the face of a devastating global pandemic, home-working policies are helping businesses to survive. Not only that, working from home comes with an unprecedented wealth of additional challenges. For example, there is a new need for many people to keep on top of their workload, whilst simultaneously educating their children from the kitchen table. Not to mention those people who do their best work in an open and collaborative environment, now forced to isolate themselves with their laptop (and perhaps a partner whom they are fast realising they don't get on with). In short, the new rules are very different to those we've ever seen before. It is therefore worth taking some time to review your home-working policy and procedures, to ensure they not only work for your employees, but are able to benefit your organisation as a whole.

Menu